Category Archives: Academics

Test Taking Tips

Test Taking Tips for Parents

How to Prepare Your Child for the Test

From Evolved Education
Be Knowledgeable
A parent’s role is to ensure that a child is thriving and preparing for and taking a standardized test does not replace that important job. One of the most important conversations we have with our parents is educating them about the test. Become informed about the test your child will take (Format, Logistics) and how to best support learning at home is key for successful students.
In addition to the services, assessments, and simulated tests Evolved Education creates for our students and families, there are many other resources available for parents. If your child has a 504 or IEP, be sure to let the testing facility know and then prepare your child accordingly. It’s important to ensure that no one has any surprises on the day of the test.

Make Skill Building Part of Your Daily Routine 
Children are constantly learning from everything and everyone around them. With our younger students – three-to-five year olds- it is a steady stream of “how” and “why” questions. Use this natural curiosity and your responses to them as part of your daily routine, to support your child’s skills that are needed for these first tests.
When we prepare the children for these early tests, there are three important aspects to the test prep: content knowledge, test taking skills, and a cognitive flexibility to focus on a range of types of questions. Underlying all of this is the stamina to sit and work on the material.
With just a little extra thought, you will be building on your child’s natural sense of learning and questioning- and filing your child up with the skills that are part of these early tests. “Test prep” then becomes easy, because learning is engaging and a wonderful part of your child’s everyday life with you and other people and experiences.
Here are a few of our favorites:
  • When you take a walk or play with toys- categories of information are all around you.
  • Before you go out for the day, or when you are going to do something together in the apartment, talk about what you are going to do “first”, “second” and “third”. Have your child repeat the “plan” to you and ask your child as you complete one part of the plan, what is next? Not only are you reinforcing these positional terms, you are supporting your child’s memory and recall strengths
  • For example when you see a bus, a car and a train- beyond identifying them individually, classify them as “transportation” in your conversation. When you see a dog, have your child name 3 or 4 “animals”. Try examples of categories such as: things that fly, cold things, things you wear, etc. Building toward higher level categorical information is an important skill.
  • When you are putting food on a plate- count with your child how many string beans the child has and how many you have- who has “more”, who has “less”- how many “more or less”? How many do we have to add to the amount which is “less” to have an “equal” amount on both plates? This can be a very motivating example if you use cookies! This builds early math skills and an understanding of the associated words.
Foster Independence
Allow your child to take the lead with regard to their standardized test preparation experience. A child’s standardized test experience should be characteristic of his or her whole academic experience. While it sounds silly, children in Pre-K are able to show their comfort level and gain the skills needed to walk away from you during testing. One of our favorite stories is the child who walked into the G&T Test for Kindergarten and said his name was Batman. While his mother made sure the proctors knew who he was, he was calm and prepared.
Feelings Matter – Even Yours! –
  • Pay close attention to how you are feeling about the standardized test. If you are anxious and worried about the test, your child may be as well. Check in with your child about how he or she is feeling about the test.
  • Work closely with your child’s teacher and tutors to help as needed with feelings of anxiety or ambivalence.
  • Over preparing or under preparing a child for a test may translate into unsuccessful results and/or undesired outcomes for a child. How your child feels about a test or during the testing period matters.
  • If your child is experiencing social stress or emotional issues, he or she may not perform at his or her best.
Be Prepared. Plan – Before – During- and After the Test
Before the test, engage your child in a discussion around the days leading up to the test and have your child jot down notes with their response. Ask your child questions such as:”How will the days leading up to the test feel and what might this look like? What can you do to feel prepared, stay busy, and keep calm? What can we (mom and dad) do to help support you in the days leading up to the test?”
Create a “During the test plan.”Engage your child in a discussion around visualizing what it will feel and look like to walk in the testing room and how to cope. Have your child write down the plan and any other thoughts. Ask your child, “How might it feel when you walk into the testing room and sit down to take that test? Can you explain what that will look like in detail? How will you cope with nerves in those moments?
Have a plan for after the test: Engage your child in a discussion around the experience after having completed the test. How might your child feel? What if it feels like things went well? What if things feel like they did not go well? Create a plan of how to manage nerves around this and how to keep busy while waiting for the results.
Tests are stressful! It will be important to work on coping skills ahead of the test by engaging in discussions about the child’s feelings, hopes, and concerns and plans of action to help the child feel more grounded and safer.
 Discuss A Testing Strategy
How will your child tackle the test? What are they thinking? What is their approach? One suggestion is to use Evolved’s 3-Tier Approach to Test-Taking:
●     STEP 1: Read through the shorter questions first and ONLY answer items that you are 90-100% confident in knowing the correct answer.
●     STEP 2: Read through the longer questions (lengthier text and steps) and ONLY answer items that you are 90-100% confident in knowing the correct answer.
●     STEP 3: Go back to the start and complete all of the remaining unanswered questions that you felt less confident in knowing the correct answer.
At Evolved Education, our team of teachers and specialists are ready to help your student and your family better understand what skills they need to be prepared. If you would like to discuss how our team can help your family, please fill out our Student Profile so that we can better understand your child’s current needs!

Understanding Your Child’s State Test Scores

Understanding your Child’s State Test Scores

By Mary E. Miele M.A.Ed, Special Education Teacher

What tests did your child take?

Each spring, students in grades 3-8 take part in the New York State Testing Program as required under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). The English Language Arts and Mathematics examinations given are based on the Common Core Learning Standards (CCLS) adopted by New York State in July 2010. However, it wasn’t until the 2012-2013 school year that the assessments in English Language Arts (ELA) and Mathematics were used to measure a student’s progress towards mastering the Common Core Learning Standards. Students take the ELA and math assessments annually through grade 8. Science and Social Studies assessments are administered in grades 4 and 8 but are not Common Core aligned.

What skills are tested?

The ELA Common Core examination tests your child’s ability to comprehend key ideas and details presented in grade level texts. Their reading comprehension score is based on their responses to multiple choice questions that measure the common core learning standards. The mathematics common core examination tests your child’s ability to solve equations using the four operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division), base ten, fractions, the number system, ratios and proportions, measurement and data, functions and geometry; which are determined by their grade level.

Your Score Report Decoded

You can locate your child’s score on your NYC Schools Account: https://www.mystudent.nyc/. You need to have your child’s ID number (found on his or her report card) as well as an Account Creation Code (provided by your child’s school) to register.

For both the ELA and Math examinations, there are four major scores reported.

Scale Score: The scale score is determined by the number of points your child earns on the test. The higher the number of points your child earned, the higher his or her scale score. There may be no scale score listed if, (1) your child did not complete a sufficient number of questions on the test to generate a score, (2) if your child was medically excused, or (3) if there was an administrative error.

Quick Tip: You should NOT compare your child’s scale score this year to the scale score from previous exam years. The range of scale scores change by grade level and should not be compared as they may falsely indicate a better/worse performance than what actually occurred.

Performance Level 2016-2017: Students are assigned a performance level based on how they perform on the test this year. There are four possible performance levels:

NYS Level 1: Students performing at this level are well below proficient in meeting grade level standards. The skills they demonstrate are insufficient to meet grade expectations and Common Core Learning Standards.

NYS Level 2: Students performing at this level are somewhat proficient in meeting grade level standards. The skills they demonstrate are on track to meet current New York high school graduation requirements but are insufficient to meet Common Core Learning Standards.

NYS Level 3: Students performing at this level are proficient in meeting grade level standards. The skills they demonstrate are sufficient to meet Common Core Learning Standards.

NYS Level 4: Students performing at this level are currently excelling in meeting the grade level standards. The skills they demonstrate are more than sufficient to meet grade level and Common Core Learning Standards.

Overall State Percentile Rank: The percentile rank compares your child’s scale score to the scores of other NY state students who took the same test this year. The rank is reported on a scale of 1-99. The higher your child’s percentage rank, the better your child did compared to other students. For example, if your child’s percentage rank is 50%, it means that your child did better than 50% of all students in their grade who took the test.

Performance Level 2015-2016: The second performance level listed indicates your child’s performance in the previous year’s examination. The 2015-2016 performance level can be compared to the 2016-2017 performance level (this year’s level) to determine if your child has improved. If your child’s performance level is lower this year than last year, it can indicate that there may be some interventions that are needed to ensure that your child continues to progress. These interventions can include providing test preparation, tutoring, and/or test accommodations offered through a 504 plan or Individualized Education Plan (IEP).

Quick Tip: Students taking the 3rd grade test will not have a previous year performance level as this is the first year of administration. Use this year’s performance level as a baseline to compare to in future years.

Next Steps

Understanding your child’s results is just the first part. While the results may or may not have been what you expected, your understanding of the results can help you support your child during the school year and help them prepare for their next assessment.

If your child’s performance was a Level 1 or Level 2:

  • Speak to your child’s teacher to get an understanding of what standards they struggle with the most. Ask for suggestions on how you can support learning at home.
  • If you went through tutoring support, review that support with your child’s tutor and create a list of what improvements could be made for next year’s process.
  • Advocate for your child to receive additional support as needed. Students whose performance level is either Level 1 or Level 2 are eligible for academic intervention services (AIS) from their schools.
  • Speak to your child about their testing experience. Ask about any fears, anxieties or difficulties they faced during testing. Your child’s feedback may help you determine what type of support they need during this time.
  • Find ways to help your child practice skills outside of school. For example, household activities like cooking, baking and shopping can help your child practice skills that will help them during testing. These activities can help students develop skills such as following multi-step directions and calculating measurements that are assessed during testing.
  • Encourage independent reading at home. All children can benefit from additional independent reading time, not just struggling students. However, some students are more hesitant to pick up a book and read without encouragement. Find a book series or genre that your child particularly enjoys and don’t worry about how “educational” it is. Even magazines, newspapers and comic books can be good material to encourage reading.
  • Consider having your child evaluated for special education services for additional support that they may need. Many students struggle silently with learning disabilities that are unsupported and are not allowing them to demonstrate all that they know and can do. Students who qualify for special education services are entitled to receive support throughout the school year and testing accommodations during assessments. Testing accommodations that may be considered include breaks during testing, administration in a distraction free location and questions read aloud. These supports can make all the difference for some students. In addition, even if they receive these supports, there are no future implications on their post-secondary school and career options.

If your child’s performance was a Level 3 or Level 4:

  • Continue to encourage your child’s progress and do not look at the results as a reason to lower expectations for their performance. Some children (and parents) develop a false confidence that can cause them to slack on school and homework. Learning is a continual process that should be guided by your child’s curiosity and your encouragement.
  • Challenge your child’s critical thinking skills. Regardless of what grade level tests they take, all assessments test your child’s ability to think critically and analyze information presented. Help your child develop critical thinking skills by asking open ended questions, encouraging them to make decisions independently, and having them make connections between what they learn and what they experience in life.
  • Help your child develop their group work skills, their social skills and reinforce academic skills by having them act as a peer tutor. School is a very important aspect to a child’s social life and development. Giving students the opportunity to interact with their peers in an academic setting is preferred by many. Many advanced students thrive in this leadership opportunity. In addition, some struggling students benefit from learning directly from their peers.
  • Speak to your child’s school about possible early promotion. Can they be switched to a higher level math class based on a strong performance? While you don’t want to push them if they are not ready, you also want to ensure that they are appropriately challenged for their ability levels. Nothing is worse than a student who loses motivation due to being “bored” and unchallenged in the classroom. Inquire about enrichment programs that may be a good fit for your child.

Note about how to discuss your child’s results: 

The way you handle your child’s test results is a very personal choice and decision. I’m simply making some suggestions here from my experience in working with families and students to help navigate your own process.

What should I share with my child? 

I advise being factual about test results with children. Tell them the scores matter of factly and work with them on a plan for what they will do to meet expectations this coming year. Provide suggestions on how to talk about their test scores with peers — or better yet advise them to keep testing information private. Even if scores are at expectation, it is important to review the preparation and make a list of what worked and what did not work.

What should our “talk” look like? 

Give factual information. If you are feeling elated, excited, upset, frustrated, disappointed, or angry — cope with your feelings first. Talk with your child when you are calm. Ask your child a series of precise questions about the results and the preparation process such as: What do you think of these results? Do you have any questions? How do you feel your preparation went this year? Did you have enough time for instruction, enough independent practice, enough mock assessments? Did you have a successful mindset, discipline and/or attitude about the testing? What skills and concepts are solid and what may need improvement?

Write out the answers and use them to create a “goal sheet” for this coming year.

In addition to interpreting results and talking with your child about the goals, give your child a way to talk about testing with friends and teachers. I think if all parents talked with their children about the fact that results are private information — we would be all better off. But, since the questions and conversations do tend to happen — you may want to suggest your child know what to say if friends start to ask. If a friend asks, “What did you get on the ELA?” The student may be able to just say, “I did great – how did you do?” and give them ways to handle the peers who may really want to know a number, “You know, I don’t really want to publicize my numbers — that’s really private info, you know!” is a great line to use, for instance. Preparedness will help students to feel better about their social interactions.

What if my child did not meet expectations? 

First of all, remember that these are test scores, and while they are one important aspect of your child’s academic experience, they are also a snapshot of that one experience. Any number of variables may contribute to a child’s success during test taking. At Evolved, we view children as whole people — academics, learning, school and home experiences as well as their social, emotional and physical development come into play at any time during their testing.

If you are feeling disappointed in the results, it may be best to talk with me or with your spouse or another parent before you speak to your child. You want your mindset to be one of constructive criticism instead of destructive criticism. The point is — be frustrated, be disappointed, and then get to work on supporting your child. And remember — this is your child’s journey. It may not go the way you have planned, but it will work out and we can partner together to support you and your child along the way!

What if I don’t want to talk with my child right now? 

I would say that if your child is in 3rd or 4th or maybe even 5th grade that is okay, but if their friends will be talking about it, it is best for you to talk with your child about the results first. You will want your child to be able to ask you questions and not their friends. Most children have been involved in the preparation for the ELA and NYS Math Tests, so they are aware that results will come out. While they may not be aware of this happening this week, once they get back to school, they may have conversations with their friends about the tests.

Other questions? Contact me — I am happy to help!

If you have any further questions, do not hesitate to contact me at mary@evolveded.com or at 917 388 3862.

 

New SHSAT

 There is a new SHSAT 

As you may have heard, the NYC Department of Education has been planning some changes in the SHSAT (Specialized High Schools Admission Test), which some 30,000 NYC eighth graders take every fall in hopes of admission to one of the city’s eight specialized high schools, including Stuyvesant High School and Bronx High School of Science.

The key takeaways are these:
  • No more scrambled paragraphs or logical reasoning
  • Grammar, syntax and editing questions will replace the removed content on the verbal side of the test
  • The test will be longer
  • The test will include “experimental” questions that are not counted toward scores
  • The math test will include some student-produced “grid-in” questions
  • 4 answer choices instead of 5

These changes are being implemented in response to Mayor Bill de Blasio’s desire to increase the enrollment in specialized high schools of historically underrepresented demographic groups. The number of African-American and Latino students at the schools has been falling in recent years, a development that has generated much public criticism. Whether these changes will move the needle on diversity is an open question that remains to be answered. In terms of test prep, it is possible that the new content on the test will necessitate more tutoring and teaching.

We have attached a DOE memo summarizing the changes to the test as of Fall 2017. These include:

  • Standard testing time is increasing from 150 minutes to 180 minutes.
  • The verbal section is being renamed the English Language Arts (ELA) section.
  • The ELA section will no longer include scrambled paragraphs and logical reasoning questions.
  • The ELA section will now include questions that address revising/editing skills, in addition to continuing to have reading comprehension passages and questions; all ELA questions will be multiple choice questions.
  • The math section will now include five “grid-in” questions, in which students must solve a computational question and provide the correct numerical answer, rather than selecting the answer from various multiple choice options; the math section will also continue to have multiple choice word problems and computational questions.
  • All multiple choice questions will now have 4 answer choices instead of the previous design with 5 answer choices.
  • Each section (ELA and math) will include 57 items: 47 items in each section will be scored, with each question worth 1 raw score point, and the remaining 10 items in each section will be field test items that are not used in determining a student’s score. Scoring and the process for using test results to determine admission to the Specialized High Schools is not changing. See further below for details.

Click here to access the DOE site where you can find information about the SHSAT.

Reprinted from our friends at Noodle Pros

ELA and NYS Math Test Preparation

New York State Testing Preparation at The Evolved Education Company

The Evolved Education Company is offering small group classes, mock testing and private lessons to support students in preparation for the NYS Tests this Spring. Here is what you need to know about the tests and our offerings.
Dates for Tests
 
  • ELA: Tuesday, March 28 – Thursday, March 30
  • NYS Math: Tuesday, May 2 – Thursday, May 4
What to Know about This Year’s Tests
  • This year’s tests are shorter in length
  • There is no time limit on the test
  • The tests contains complex questions (for both ELA and NYS Math)
  • The questions test understanding of concepts, not just mastery of skills.
  • Math contains multi-step problems

What to know about the ELA Test

Questions are text based and students should find answers in the text. There are a good amount of “prove it” questions — requiring students to go back to the text to find the answers and to back up their answers with text evidence.

Passages will be authentic and will be balanced between information and literacy text. For grades 3-5, the texts will balance  information and literacy topics. For grades 6-8, the texts will also include subject-based texts. Students should be familiar with academic vocabulary.

The ELA Test will include passages to read and multiple choice questions, short response questions and extended response questions.

Students should be able to do the following:

  • Find Main Idea by pulling quotes, summarizing them, answering a questions such as “a title similar to this passage would be…”
  • Make Inferences
  • Understand Structure and Craft
  • Be able to read and understand texts above grade level
What to know about the NYS Math Test
The math test focuses on priority standards. Students are required to write out their answers, demonstrate deep understanding of concepts, fluency and application skills.
The test contains multi-step words problems, short answer and extended response questions where the answer must be described using words.
Students must practice reading directions and following them. Some are complex.
For older students who are dealing with finding percent off and tip, they will need to master the concept and skill to solve these multi-step problems.
Often problems relate to real life –such as using a menu, money, sales tax, tip, or riddles.
Test Preparation Class Information

GREAT PREPARATION BEGINS WITH GREAT TEACHING
Introduction

Performance on state tests have an impact on student choice when it comes to middle and high school admissions, particularly for 4th and 7th graders. At EEC, we will defuse the anxiety and stress built up around the process. We instill confidence in our students as we help them to deconstruct the tests, how to approach each question and manage their time on the test day. We make our courses fun and engaging!

EEC Test-Preparation Program: ELA and MATH for 3rd through 8th Graders 

Differentiation: The first part of the program involves getting to know our students. We use the Evolved Education Paradigm and a placement test for ELA and MATH  to determine how each student can thrive in our program. We learn and evaluate a student’s academic history, learning styles, school environment, family environment and social-emotional-physical quotient prior to creating the student’s individualized and custom-tailored program.


Based on the information we gather, we create a test-preparation program that combines content and strategy.  Where applicable: some of the lessons will be whole-class, but most will be created for individuals or small groups of students with similar needs and will include study tactics and approaches and test-taking techniques to alleviate test-taking anxiety and ensure optimal performance on these standardized tests.

Curriculum: We teach both content and strategy and have found it is often best to weave the two together. For example, if we are building vocabulary, we will simultaneously teach students how to look for common root words. For the ELA and NYS Math courses we are ensuring mastery in the priority items for each test and giving plenty of guided and independent practice. In addition, because of our education background and pedagogical strengths, we are able to create lessons that include hands-on activities, games to improve mastery and motivation, and traditional, stamina-building test preparation exercises.

Materials: According to the Department of Education, the exams have been redesigned to cover a broader range of performance indicators including common core standards.  Our preparation materials will reflect the new test formats and common core standards. We use a combination of typical test preparation materials. However, our master test-prep tutors will heavily supplement lessons according to student’s’ individual needs.

Class Structure: Group classes vary according to needs; one-to-one classes are structured according to the specific needs of the student and his or her family.

Teachers: Each test preparation class is taught by certified and trained EEC teachers, and is supervised and overseen by EEC Test Preparation Lead, Christina Amendola. Christina will visit in-class lessons, and she will oversee the curriculum development. She will be collecting and maintaining data analysis on each student’s progress, and working to identify and address specific learning differences so as to determine how lessons will be differentiated and scaffolded, unlocking the potential for each student in the program. What this means for our students is that they will each have careful attention and meaningful instruction in preparation for the State Tests. 

The Evolved Education’s Mock Testing Program

One of the most challenging aspects of taking a standardized test is the newness factor. Even for a seemingly simple task like using one’s pencil to fill in a bubble sheet can be thrown off by testing in a room full of strangers in a strange place or sitting for the unusually long period of time required by most standardized tests.

EEC’s mock testing program involves creating an environment that mirrors the actual test day. The information gathered from each student’s practice test is used to inform future lessons so as to ensure improvement. Each test is graded, data is collected, and feedback including specific follow-up work is provided prior to the next lesson. Additionally, we are able to provide accommodations for students with IEPs or 504s.

Each mock test is given a number grade and detailed feedback. Individual recommendations regarding the number of recommended practice tests an individual student takes will be made as the course progresses. 

There is an additional fee for mock testing and they can register by clicking here.
Here are the dates:
1/22
1/29
2/5
2/12
2/26
3/5
3/12
3/19
3/26
4/2
4/9
4/23
4/30

The Evolved Education’s Partnership with Parents and Caregivers

Inherent to EEC’s whole-child philosophy is our belief that families play a crucial role in the educational endeavors of their children at all points of the educational process. Knowledge is power; and, we empower families with our knowledge not only of what their children are learning, but how they are learning. We provide families with the tools they need to support their children at home in order to make any test preparation process successful.

Teachers will provide families with weekly reports for each student.

The EEC Paradigm and Track Record

Our company’s support for each member of our community, whether their program be one-to-one, small-group, large-group, online or in-person, is individualized. Each child, family and school is unique and our Evolved Education Paradigm allows us to recognize and honor each student’s distinctive strengths and challenges.

EEC provides top quality customized test preparation courses. Families that contract with EEC do so through an understanding and recognition of the importance of a test preparation program that works within a paradigm that is developmentally appropriate for prepubescent and pubescent children because doing so ensures each student will reach his or her academic potential. Of the students we have worked with 99% of them have scored within the top 75% of students who take standardized tests and over 95% of them have scored within the top 99% of the students who take standardized tests. We have a track record of excellent results and look forward to helping your children reach their highest potential!

 

Universal PreK Application Process Information 2017

Universal Pre-Kindergarten: Everything You Need to Find a Program, Apply and Help Your Child Excel

 by Mary Miele from the The Evolved Education Company

A Presentation for Parents: Universal Pre-Kindergarten In NYC

IMPORTANT DATES FOR 2017-2018
  • Applications Open on Monday, January 17, 2017
  • Information Sessions Wednesday, January 18-January 25, 2017
  • Application Due on February 24, 2017
  • Offer Letters sent Late April 2017
  • Pre-register by May 9, 2017
  • Round 2 Application Process April 20- May 9, 2017

Find more details here: DOE Main Webpage

Find more information about UPreK here

What is Universal Pre-K?
  • A free program offered through the NYC Department of Education.
  • Runs five days a week, from September through June.
  • Most programs are full day (6 hours and 20 minutes)
  • Some programs are half-day (2 hours and 30 minutes)
Which are the Different Program Types?
  •  District Schools-Programs: Located within elementary schools
  • NYCEECs: Community-based Organizations that contract directly with the NYCDOE to provide pre-K
  • NYCDOE Pre-K Centers: Unique learning environments dedicated exclusively to pre-K students, led and operated by NYCDOE staff.
  • Charter Schools: Public school programs that contract directly with the NYCDOE.
What is the curriculum?

A Foundation for the Common Core vs. Common Core Curriculum

  • Approaches to Learning: Engagement, Creativity and Imagination, Curiosity and Initiative and Persistence
  • Physical Development and Health
  • Social and Emotional Development
  • Communication, Language and Literacy
What “Academics” Will Be Included?
  • Approaches to Communication
  • Reading: Literature and Foundational Skills
  • Writing
  • Speaking and Listening
  • Math
  • Science
  • Social Studies
  • Arts
  • Technology
How Do You Apply and Enroll Once Accepted?

Step 1: Explore your options! Pre-K Options. Read school reviews, tour schools and reach out to other parents. Use this document as a guide while touring: Pre-K Tour Checklist. Go to an Open House.

Step 2: Submit your application between 1/19 and 2/24 (you may do so online at online application, on the phone at 718-935-2067  (8am-6pm, Monday -Friday) or in person at a Family Welcome Center (8am – 3pm, Monday – Friday). Click here to find a local Family Welcome Centers.

Step 3: Receive offer letter via regular mail or email, if you applied online.

Step 4: Pre-Register before the deadline (you must bring your child with you, proof of child’s date of birth and two proofs of your address: see this list for acceptable documentation).

How Do You Decide What to List on the Application? 
  • You may list up to 12 programs in any zone or district across NYC: If you are interested in district school pre-K programs, and you have a zoned school with pre-K, you are encouraged to list it on your application. While placement is not guaranteed, your child will have a high priority to be admitted to your zoned school.
  • After you list your most preferred choice(s), you should also include other programs in case your child cannot be placed at one of your most preferred programs. Adding more programs to your list will not decrease your chances of receiving an offer to your first choice.
  • Your order matters: List them in your TRUE order of preference : Your ranking of programs does not affect your priority at those programs. You are matched to your highest-ranked program possible, based on your and other applicants’ priorities.
    Listing more programs on your application does not decrease your chances of getting an offer to your first choice program.
  • Eligibility matters: Read the priorities that each program gives– Some NYCEECs may have additional eligibility criteria related to your household income, address, or childcare needs. Click on the Information icon next to choices on your online application or review the Pre-K Directory or Pre-K Finder to check whether there are any additional eligibility requirements at programs you are interested in.
  • If you are interested in half-day and five-hour NYCEEC pre-K programs or charter school programs, contact those programs directly to apply
  • No transportation is provided
  • Some programs offer extended day for a fee

What if you don’t get your first choice as your offering? 

If you do not receive an offer to your first choice program, your child will automatically be placed on the waitlist for that program and any other programs you ranked higher than the program where your child receives an offer. For example, if you receive a placement offer for the program you listed third on your application, your child will automatically be added to the waitlists for your first and second choices. Programs will contact you directly if a seat becomes available for your child; no additional action is required to remain on the waitlist.

Additionally, if you do not receive an offer to any of the programs listed on your application, you will receive an offer to a program with available seats, as close as possible to your home address. Your child will also be placed on the waitlist for all programs listed on your application.

What Should You Expect After You Submit an Application?
  • All families who submit an application by the deadline will receive an offer
  • If none of your preferred programs are available to you, you will be assigned to one by the DOE
  • You might be wait-listed

What Should You Look For in a Pre-K Program? Do Your “Field Work” 

  • Visit the websites of the schools that interest you
  • Read independent reviews about any NYC school here:                      Inside Schools                                                                                                           Noodle
What are the Next Steps? Transitioning to Pre-K

Use this worksheet to guide you through transitioning your child and family into Pre-K and to help your child excel in school.                     Pre-K Next Steps Worksheet

Visit this site to see what your child will be learning in Pre-K          Pre-K Learn

What can you do outside of school to support your                                Pre-K On The Go

EEC Pre-K Services

What  Support is Available to You From Evolved Education Company? 

EEC offers tutoring, consulting, and information sessions.

Tutoring

We create academic support that addresses all aspects of a child’s learning process. We can help families with test preparation, school readiness or academic support.

By creating a Learning Profile for each child using the Evolved Education Paradigm, which includes information about a student’s academic record and standing, organizational and executive function skills, school, home and family environment, as well as emotional well- being—instructors create lessons that meet academic goals for each student.

Consulting Services

Learn about Universal Pre-K process and work in person with a specialist to learn specifics about programs and choices. Develop an individualized Pre-K plan that works for your child and family.

Thinking about moving out of NYC? Explore your child’s schooling options with a school placement specialist. Learn details about both public and private schools for your new location or for the location you are researching.

Information Sessions

Gather your group of friends or have EEC come to speak at your child’s school about the PreK process. EEC offers an array of speaking and information sessions year round. Check out our upcoming events here.

To set up an appointment or for a price quote for in-person services, remote services or pre-paid packages :                                                        email us at  info@evolveded.com or call us at 917-388-3862. 

 

Top Tips for High School Juniors and Seniors

EEC Top Tips for High School Juniors and Seniors

With the holidays right around the corner, December is a busy month! The college process is gearing up for juniors and seniors who are eagerly awaiting the results from their applications. Early Decision and Early Action decisions are being mailed this month and a lot can be done in preparation of the New Year.

Here are suggestions for juniors and seniors from EEC’s College Counselor, Molly Kahan.

JUNIORS

Make your first New Year’s Resolution! Juniors should get a jump start on the college process, because starting early will make it manageable, stress-free and fun.

  • Write a description of your “ideal” college and think about what you would like in a college or university in terms of size, location, academic majors, extracurricular activities, sports teams, distance from home, etc.
  • Visit local colleges to get a “feel” for different types of campuses.
  • Create an account with the College Board (collegeboard.org).
  • Register for the SAT and/or ACT in February, March, and/or April.
  • Register for the SAT Subject Exams for June, if applicable.
  • Prepare for the SAT and/or ACT: ask us about EEC’s Test Preparation Program.
  • Schedule college visits over February and Spring breaks.
  • Get involved! Find volunteer opportunities, clubs and extracurricular activities that interest you.
  • Research and apply to summer internship opportunities.
  • Meet with your school counselor to discuss course selections for senior year.
  • Schedule a college consultation session with EEC’s college counselor, Molly Kahan, LMSW to create an individualized college timeline. You can reach her at college@evolveded.com.

SENIORS

If you have been accepted into an Early Decision school, withdraw all remaining submitted applications.

If you have been accepted into multiple Early Action schools, make your decisions and/or start to compare the financial aid packages.

Complete and submit Regular Decision applications.

  • If you have been deferred from an Early Decision or Early Action school, finalize your college list and submit those applications for the Regular Decision deadlines.
  • Remember to have a well-balanced list of “reach”, “target”, and “likely” schools. Do not get discouraged; you will find a school that is a “good fit” even if it was not your original “dream” school.
  • Send your SAT and/or ACT scores to Regular Decision schools.
  • File the FAFSA and CSS Profile for financial aid if you have not already done so.
  • Research and apply for additional scholarships through the institution or outside organizations.
  • Once all of your applications have been submitted, write thank-you notes to anyone who wrote a letter of recommendation.

After the New Year

Look at important dates and attend an “Accepted Student Day” if you still have not made your final decision.
Visit any schools to which you were accepted and have not yet toured.

NYC Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten Admissions Information

Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten NYC Admissions Planning

By: Mary E. Miele

Before you endeavor in education planning, we want you to take a few minutes to think about your child in terms of each of the following ways:

  1. Record your child’s academic history.
  • What has your child’s experience been like? Formal? Informal? Private? Public?
  • What academic experiences has your child had so far?
  • What are your concerns and/or what are your child’s concerns?
  1. Write about your child’s learning style.
  • Find a chart in the book on page 36.
  • Does your child have a diagnosis of any kind which may affect his or her learning or emotional well-being?
  1. Write about your child’s school.
  • How does your child perform at his or her school currently?
  • What does your child love about school? What does he or she not love about school?
  1. Write about your family.
  • What are your family’s education values? What kind of school do you want your child to be in and what type of education is important to you? 
  1. Tell us about your child socially, emotionally and physically.
  • How is your child developing socially, emotionally and physically
  • Go to page 85 in the book to learn more about how to monitor your child’s social, emotional and physical development.

Pre-Kindergarten Process Information

For the UPREK Process, here are some great links and resources:

For Independent School Information:

Kindergarten Process Information

Public School:

Independent School:

Religiously Affiliated School:

Please continue to revisit EEC and follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for up to the date information about our speaking series in 2017! And Email us today for a free consultation to find out how we can help you with the Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten admission process.

 

 

 

Supporting School Success Stories

Success Stories using The Evolved Education Paradigm

by: Mary Miele
This week and every week, I will be talking about different topics presented in our book, Supporting School: A Guidebook for Parents and Educators.
Deanna and I wrote this book with the mission to empower more parents and educators to include a whole-child approach when supporting and educating students.
This week, we talk about an educator who used our paradigm and its power to unlock the potential of every child. We learned the paradigm can easily be implemented so as to positively affect the experience of a child. 
Maria* is a grade nine math teacher. She has been teaching for five years and in her 5th year, began to use the paradigm with her students. To do so, she invited parents to provide information about each child’s academic history, learning style, school and family environment and to complete the Social-Emotional-Physical-Academic Quotient Inventory at their parent/teacher conference. 
At first, Maria simply used the information she gathered to make small adjustments in her every day teaching so as to play to her students’ strengths and to help them overcome areas of challenge. For example, one of her students was described as having a hard time expressing her emotions, so Maria provided her with words to use around her feelings in class. This opened up a conversation between Maria and this student which allowed them to uncover the student’s anxiety around learning math, something with which she had struggled. Maria learned the student’s anxiety needed to be addressed before the student could learn the material. Maria and the girl’s parents discussed strategies the student could use at home and in class to help alleviate the stress around the subject of math. The student’s improvement was almost immediate. Her grades and self confidence went up while her anxiety came down.
Educators tell us the paradigm informs teaching and opens lines of communication between parents and educators in ways which support successful learning experiences for students.  

NYC High School Admissions

HIGH SCHOOL ADMISSIONS

Our Talk with NYC Admissions Solutions

By: Mary E. Miele, founder The Evolved Education Company

It’s that time of year again — NYC High School Admissions time and on Saturday, September 17th we join Maurice Frumkin from NYC Admissions Solutions to give information to families about the High School Admissions Process at Wagner Middle School.

Here are a few key resources for every family to have on hand during the high school process.

Specialized High School Handbook

Specialized High School News and Dates for Testing and Auditions

Citywide High School Directory

Manhattan High School Directory

Mock Testing is a fantastic way to prepare for a standardized test. EEC offers all tests, even with accommodations to students this fall. We hold them at Marymount Manhattan College on Saturday mornings in the fall. Email Mary at mary@evolveded.com to book your test. Mock testing costs $150/sitting and includes the test and a graded report within 48 hours of test.

Saturday 9/17 9:00-1:00pm
Saturday 9/24 9:00-1:00pm
Saturday 10/1 9:00-1:00pm
Saturday 10/8 9:00-1:00pm
Saturday 10/15 9:00-1:00pm
Saturday 10/22 9:00-1:00pm
Saturday 10/29 9:00-1:00pm
Saturday 11/5 9:00-1:00pm
Saturday 11/12 9:00-1:00pm
Saturday 11/19 9:00-1:00pm
Saturday 12/3 9:00-1:00pm
Screened High Schools rank students based on certain criteria including final report card grades, ELA and math standardized test scores, and attendance and punctuality from the prior school year. They may also require an interview, essay, on-site exam, or demonstrated interest in the school (such as attendance at an Open House or other school visit).
To prepare for essays, interviews and all-around excellence in school, call us for a free 15 minute consultation. You may also enjoy our tips as follows:
  • Have your child write practice essays on topics such as “What was your favorite book and why?” “What was  a challenging experience you have overcome and why?” Have someone other than the child’s parent edit and provide feedback on the essay.
  • Practice interviews authentically. Have someone your child does not know perform a mock interview with your child.
  • Prepare and organize your child’s audition and/or portfolio.
  • Be aware of the education standards your child needs to work towards. Work with whole child educators to help your child and your family to thrive within today’s education process.
  • Understand your child’s full academic profile using The Evolved Education Paradigm. Visit us here to learn more.
  • Use your child’s strengths to instill strong study strategies, planning and organization techniques, and academic goal setting into your child’s education experience in middle school. These practices best prepare your child for success in high school.

Above all, during the high school process it is important to remind your child of his or her strengths, talents and passions as well as the qualities you love about him or her. Change and competition are challenging positions for anyone, but especially teenagers. Help your child to thrive throughout the high school process by being organized, by having support, and by enjoying the privilege of having school choice in one of the most amazing cities to raise our young people.

 

Understanding your Child’s State Test Scores

Title: Understanding your Child’s State Test Scores

By Nicole Lucien M.S.Ed, Special Education Teacher

What tests did your child take?

Each spring, students in grades 3-8 take part in the New York State Testing Program as required under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). The English Language Arts and Mathematics examinations given are based on the Common Core Learning Standards (CCLS) adopted by New York State in July 2010. However, it wasn’t until the 2012-2013 school year that the assessments in English Language Arts (ELA) and Mathematics were used to measure a student’s progress towards mastering the Common Core Learning Standards. Students take the ELA and math assessments annually through grade 8. Science and Social Studies assessments are administered in grades 4 and 8 but are not Common Core aligned.

Quick Tip: The results from the ELA and Math Common Core Tests are not included in your child’s official transcript or permanent student record at this time. However, that can change in the future.

What skills are tested?

The ELA Common Core examination tests your child’s ability to comprehend key ideas and details presented in grade level texts. Their reading comprehension score is based on their responses to multiple choice questions that measure the common core learning standards. The mathematics common core examination tests your child’s ability to solve equations using the four operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division), base ten, fractions, the number system, ratios and proportions, measurement and data, functions and geometry; which are determined by their grade level.

What was different this year?

More Teacher Input: Based on the feedback given to the New York State Education Department (NYSED), there were a few changes made to the examinations administered this year. The NYSED has significantly increased the number of educators who are involved in creating and reviewing the assessments. This will help ensure that assessments are rigorous but fair for all students.

Shorter Test Length: One consistent recommendation made to NYSED was to reduce the length of the test. Based on this feedback, the assessments administered this year had a reduced number of test questions on both the ELA and Math tests. Specifically, the ELA test had one less passage and fewer comprehension questions to allow students more time to read the passages more closely. For the math test, students also had fewer questions to answer.

No Time Limits: The biggest change implemented this year is a shift to untimed testing for all students. Feedback from educators indicated that students found it difficult to work at their own pace under the timed conditions. With the shift to untimed testing, students were given more of an opportunity to demonstrate what they know and what they can do. Guidelines indicate that as long as students were working productively, they were allowed as much time as they need to complete the test.

Quick Tip: Assessments are continually updated based on student performance and feedback. The shorter test length and unlimited time are not guaranteed for this upcoming school year. Speak to your child’s school before the upcoming state tests this spring to see if there are any changes to these guidelines.

Your Score Report Decoded

You can locate your child’s score on your NYC Schools Account: https://www.mystudent.nyc/. You need to have your child’s ID number (found on his or her report card) as well as an Account Creation Code (provided by your child’s school) to register.

For both the ELA and Math examinations, there are four major scores reported.

Scale Score: The scale score is determined by the number of points your child earns on the test. The higher the number of points your child earned, the higher his or her scale score. There may be no scale score listed if, (1) your child did not complete a sufficient number of questions on the test to generate a score, (2) if your child was medically excused, or (3) if there was an administrative error.

Quick Tip: You should NOT compare your child’s scale score this year to the scale score from previous exam years. The range of scale scores change by grade level and should not be compared as they may falsely indicate a better/worse performance than what actually occurred.

Performance Level 2015-2016: Students are assigned a performance level based on how they perform on the test this year. There are four possible performance levels:

NYS Level 1: Students performing at this level are well below proficient in meeting grade level standards. The skills they demonstrate are insufficient to meet grade expectations and Common Core Learning Standards.

NYS Level 2: Students performing at this level are somewhat proficient in meeting grade level standards. The skills they demonstrate are on track to meet current New York high school graduation requirements but are insufficient to meet Common Core Learning Standards.

NYS Level 3: Students performing at this level are proficient in meeting grade level standards. The skills they demonstrate are sufficient to meet Common Core Learning Standards.

NYS Level 4: Students performing at this level are currently excelling in meeting the grade level standards. The skills they demonstrate are more than sufficient to meet grade level and Common Core Learning Standards.

Quick Tip: The New York City Department of Education has indicated that state test results will not have promotion consequences for students until at least the 2019-2020 school year. Results of the state test are only one measure of your child’s performance and should be considered in conjunction with student work on classroom assignments, projects, essays, and other assessments. However, private, parochial or catholic schools may have their own promotion criterion that incorporates Common Core test results. Speak to your child’s school in the beginning of the school year about the promotion criteria for their grade level and what assessments and metrics are used as part of promotion consideration. Then follow up with teachers throughout the school year to see how your child is progressing towards the promotion criteria. This can help you spot any difficulties they may be having so that additional help and remediation can be arranged with their teacher as early as possible.

Overall State Percentile Rank: The percentile rank compares your child’s scale score to the scores of other NY state students who took the same test this year. The rank is reported on a scale of 1-99. The higher your child’s percentage rank, the better your child did compared to other students. For example, if your child’s percentage rank is 50%, it means that your child did better than 50% of all students in their grade who took the test.

Quick Tip: Keep in mind that if your child was held back, their percentage rank is compared to students in their grade level, not their age. Keep this in mind when considering the percentile rank.

Performance Level 2014-2015: The second performance level listed indicates your child’s performance in the previous year’s examination. The 2014-2015 performance level can be compared to the 2015-2016 performance level (this year’s level) to determine if your child has improved. If your child’s performance level is lower this year than last year, it can indicate that there may be some interventions that are needed to ensure that your child continues to progress. These interventions can include providing test preparation, tutoring, and/or test accommodations offered through a 504 plan or Individualized Education Plan (IEP).

Quick Tip: Students taking the 3rd grade test will not have a previous year performance level as this is the first year of administration. Use this year’s performance level as a baseline to compare to in future years.

Next Steps

Understanding your child’s results is just the first part. While the results may or may not have been what you expected, your understanding of the results can help you support your child during the school year and help them prepare for their next assessment.

If your child’s performance was a Level 1 or Level 2:

  • Speak to your child’s teacher to get an understanding of what standards they struggle with the most. Ask for suggestions on how you can support learning at home.
  • Advocate for your child to receive additional support as needed. Students whose performance level is either Level 1 or Level 2 are eligible for academic intervention services (AIS) from their schools.
  • Speak to your child about their testing experience. Ask about any fears, anxieties or difficulties they faced during testing. Your child’s feedback may help you determine what type of support they need during this time.
  • Find ways to help your child practice skills outside of school. For example, household activities like cooking, baking and shopping can help your child practice skills that will help them during testing. These activities can help students develop skills such as following multi-step directions and calculating measurements that are assessed during testing.
  • Encourage independent reading at home. All children can benefit from additional independent reading time, not just struggling students. However, some students are more hesitant to pick up a book and read without encouragement. Find a book series or genre that your child particularly enjoys and don’t worry about how “educational” it is. Even magazines, newspapers and comic books can be good material to encourage reading.
  • Consider having your child evaluated for special education services for additional support that they may need. Many students struggle silently with learning disabilities that are unsupported and are not allowing them to demonstrate all that they know and can do. Students who qualify for special education services are entitled to receive support throughout the school year and testing accommodations during assessments. Testing accommodations that may be considered include breaks during testing, administration in a distraction free location and questions read aloud. These supports can make all the difference for some students. In addition, even if they receive these supports, there are no future implications on their post-secondary school and career options.

If your child’s performance was a Level 3 or Level 4:

  • Continue to encourage your child’s progress and do not look at the results as a reason to lower expectations for their performance. Some children (and parents) develop a false confidence that can cause them to slack on school and homework. Learning is a continual process that should be guided by your child’s curiosity and your encouragement.
  • Challenge your child’s critical thinking skills. Regardless of what grade level tests they take, all assessments test your child’s ability to think critically and analyze information presented. Help your child develop critical thinking skills by asking open ended questions, encouraging them to make decisions independently, and having them make connections between what they learn and what they experience in life.
  • Help your child develop their group work skills, their social skills and reinforce academic skills by having them act as a peer tutor. School is a very important aspect to a child’s social life and development. Giving students the opportunity to interact with their peers in an academic setting is preferred by many. Many advanced students thrive in this leadership opportunity. In addition, some struggling students benefit from learning directly from their peers.
  • Speak to your child’s school about possible early promotion. Can they be switched to a higher level math class based on a strong performance? Should they be considered to skip a grade? While you don’t want to push them if they are not ready, you also want to ensure that they are appropriately challenged for their ability levels. Nothing is worse than a student who loses motivation due to being “bored” and unchallenged in the classroom. Inquire about enrichment programs that may be a good fit for your child.

 

Summertime Equals Preparationtime

Summertime Equals Preparationtime

An Article for Parents of High School Students: Preparing for the College Transition

By Molly Lieberman, EEC College Counselor

Graduating from high school and starting college will be one of the biggest transitions an adolescent will experience.

How can a parent best support this transition? One word: PREPARATION. Junior and senior year of high school is the time to start talking about the transition and the time to equip your child with the tools and skills needed for becoming more independent in college. With the increase of responsibilities and the decrease of support structures in college, students often feel overwhelmed, stressed, and anxious. By speaking candidly about some of these changes and by empowering your child with knowledge, the transition can be a less scary thing.

A high school student, with or without a learning disability, is provided with a plethora of support and resources including: parents, teachers, counselors, coaches, and tutors. Once they enter college they must advocate for themselves and make sure their academic and emotional needs are being met. Those needs must be identified and discussed openly so that the student feels empowered to ask for help when necessary. They must be aware of their learning styles, whether or not they have a learning disability, and know where, from whom, and how to ask for help. Parents should start having these conversations early on in their high school careers and allow for their child to practice advocating for themselves when appropriate.

Parents can begin to help prepare their child for the independence college provides. Freshman year of college is a major transition for students, for many it is their first time away from home and having to take care of themselves. College classes are structured much differently than in high school. Classes don’t meet everyday and there is a larger focus on long-term assignments (midterm and final) rather than smaller assignments throughout the semester. Students must take responsibility and keep up with all of their work in order not to cram before a test. They will have to get themselves up and be prepared for class. Does your child have a plan in place on how to structure this newfound free time? How will they be able to organize themselves and make sure they are prepared for class?

Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Year

An essential tool for students is an academic planner, which should be used throughout high school. A planner is a tool utilized to plan out assignments, projects, papers, and nightly homework. In addition, after school activities and other commitments should be recorded in order to visualize and organize “free time”. By having the student take ownership of their planner in high school, which parents can monitor, it will help prepare them on how to prioritize responsibilities once they arrive at college. Breaking down each assignment into small manageable pieces can help alleviate some stress and anxiety. A planner will help to create a realistic study schedule. This practice can then be replicated once students are in college without their parents monitoring them as closely.

Junior and Senior Year

Other ways to prepare a student would be for each one to know how to do their laundry, make food when necessary, budget money, and regulate their emotions when things do not go according to plan. Discomfort is a natural part of life and growing. Although parents want to mediate and manage everything for their child, sometimes a child will have to regulate their emotions when something does not go exactly as they planned it to occur. Additionally, students need to know how to ask for help, early and often. They should be comfortable with asking for help, and that practice can begin in high school. If they are taking medication, do they know where and when to get it refilled? Knowing what is offered in terms of Office of Disability, Writing Center, Health Center, and the Counseling Center will be immeasurable for their toolkit when making the transition to college. Recognizing their strengths and weaknesses will help them to thrive in this new environment.

College brings forth new experiences, but if a young adult is not well equipped to handle these changes, the adjustment period will be more difficult to manage. The key is to practice, practice, practice while still in high school when their support systems are intact, but still give them more responsibilities in order to prepare for college.

Make a plan for your transition into college or into the college admission process by contacting Molly at college@evolveded.com.

Summer Planning

Summer Academic Planning

Grab your calendar, your kids and let’s get to work!

By: Mary Miele, Founder of The Evolved Education Company

For many parents, summer time transitions include academic planning. For most school-aged children, summer lasts anywhere from eight to sixteen weeks. During that time, without any academic activity, a child may lose up to 2/3 of their academic aptitude and skill if they do not read, engage in math and other academic concepts.

Parents can easily combat the summer learning deficit by putting together a solid plan which can be accomplished in about an hour’s time.

Step 1: Create a calendar of your summer.        

Create a calendar of your summer. You can print templates using Microsoft Word or use a wall calendar.

Step 2: What are you already committed to doing this summer?

Place in camps, classes, family commitments, social events. Fill the calendar with what you are already committed to.

Step 3: Write down what academic work your child MUST do this summer.

Create this list by:

Talking with your child’s teacher. What does your child’s teacher believe he or she should work on this summer?

Make a note of what courses your child will take next year — are any of them going to be challenging for your child? If so, you may consider previewing course work. This is especially popular for students entering 8th through 12th grade.

See our checklist of popular summer academic activities and chose from that list.

Step 4: Prioritize the academic work your child MUST do this summer.

Number the list from Step 3. #1 is the highest priority and must have the most amount of time spent on-task, and the largest number has the least priority and will have the least amount of time spent on-task.

Step 5: Gather the materials and resources your child will need to complete academic work.

Gather the books your child will need to read, the math work your child needs to learn, the science or history course work you want your child to complete, the coding, typing, or handwriting program you want your child to work through.

Collect videos, education games, and the projects you want your child to complete.

Curate the foreign language software, workbooks and tutoring you may want your child to have.

Step 6: Categorize the academic work your child MUST do this summer.

Every day work = work your child needs to complete each day

Every week work = work your child needs to complete each week

Every month work = work your child needs to complete each month

I suggest color coding these tasks.

Step 7: Place the academic work your child MUST do this summer onto his or her summer calendar.                                                                                                        

For all children, at any age, it is helpful to work through this process alongside or with your child. In this way, your child will have ownership over when each task will be completed.

For instance, maybe your child would prefer to get up a half an hour early for camp to read and work on a math worksheet instead of doing this at the end of the camp day. How will you know this unless you ask your child?

Step 8: Create a routine around completing summer work with your child. Write down this routine on a checklist sheet and laminate it. Grab a few dry erase markers and put the checklist in one spot in your house—preferably near the summer calendar.  

Have your child work through the checklist a few times with you before you allow your child to work through the checklist on his or her own. Sample checklists to follow in this eBook.

Step 9: Create a weekly review period for you and your child to reflect on work completed and to amend plans as needed.                                                     

Each week, it is important to schedule a time to sit with your child and review tasks completed and amend plans as needed.

Sometimes, a student will become sick, or a family will be invited to a friend’s place to swim and plans need to be changed. This is all okay as long as you have the ability to move tasks to another day!

Many students and families find that planning either on a Thursday evening or Sunday evening (or both) is a helpful routine to establish.

Step 10: Gather motivation and support by joining with other like-minded parents and organizations to help your child to learn all summer long. For instance: NY Public Library, Bank’s Summer Reading Programs, Book Blossom’s Book Clubs, or The Evolved Education Company’s Summer List Serve.